Come out and support the Mapleton Youth City Council and our 2021 Fundraiser at Ira Allen Park on the evening of July 24th, before the Fireworks show. We will be selling Popcorn, Cotton Candy, Mixed Sodas and Water.

All proceeds will go to the Utah Maasai Mission and African Independence Development (keep scrolling to learn more about this cause). If you'd like to donate to the Utah Maasai Mission, please click on the DONATE NOW button below, and you will be directed to the African Independence Development website. THANK YOU for your support of MYCC and the Utah Maasai Mission. 

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2021 MYCC Fundraiser

Supporting the Utah Maasai Mission and African Independence Development

The Maasai are one of the most impoverished tribes in East Africa. A noble and dignified people, they have proudly mantained their traditional lifestyle and cultural identity despite pressures of the modern world. They live a nomadic lifestyle raising cattle and goats, wearing traditional clothes, and living in small villages called manyattas, which are circular arrangements of mud huts. But increasing land acquisition throughout Kenya’s Maasailand is threatening their nomadic culture, and pressure to accept change is growing world which I accept it as a masai learned warrior. With this pressure comes a more urgent need to educate the current generation of boys and girls but mostly the girls, because of the lower dignity being given in masai life. In the process of preserving their culture, however, the Maasai have embraced a system that denies women basic human rights: the right to an education; the right to control her body, the right to choose whom and when to marry, the right to express an opinion.

Thank you for your support!

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Utah Maasai Mission

A non-profit started by Lars and Cassie Eggertson of Mapleton, this organization is determined to empower the Maasai people through education. Your donation will go toward educating teenage girls.

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DONATE NOW

Donate to African Independence Development to help support education for our Kenyan girls, allowing a better life for them and for their entire community. Your donation will go toward sending girls to High School, or supporting ongoing projects in the community. Your support is deeply appreciated.

Read more about our cause:

Hello My Name is Ezekiel kadika letura from Kenya maasai mara and I would like to write about a maasai girl or woman life and this the story:

Most of masai girl /woman goes through poverty and cultural oppression. Just to mention since independence here in Kenya one generation ago, less than 20 percent of Maasai women in Kenya enrolled in school.

Maasai girls are circumcised between the ages of 11 to 13 years and soon afterwards married to a man chosen by her father in exchange for cattle and cash and as one of the community learned I feel so pain to see bright and future promising girls here of 21 century undergoes such tradition and culture so I'm so glad and happy share this story about masai girl child. A Maasai woman will never be allowed to divorce, except in the most egregious cases of physical abuse, and will never be allowed to marry again, even if the husband her father chooses is an old man who dies when she is still in her teens. Instead, she becomes the property of one of her husband’s brothers. She will be one of multiple wives, and will have many children, regardless of her health or ability to provide for them and this is the duties of maasai girl /woman, She will rise early every day to milk cows, and spend her days walking miles to water holes to launder clothes and get water, and to gather heavy loads of firewood to carry back home. If she is lucky, she will have a donkey to share her burden. She will live a life of few physical comforts, dependent on a husband and a family she did not choose.one thing I believe and trust

If you educate a woman/girl: She will know her rights and have the confidence and independence to stand up for them. She will choose whom to marry and when to marry. She will have fewer children, and they will be healthier and better educated than the previous generation. She will not circumcise her daughters. She will have economic security. She will spend 90 percent of her income on her family, compared to 35 percent that an educated man would spend because some of the women spend good time with their families. She will help support her parents. She will not forget where she came from. Because of the life their parents and elderly siblings have undergone.

The Maasai are one of the most impoverished tribes in East Africa. A noble and dignified people, they have proudly mantained their traditional lifestyle and cultural identity despite pressures of the modern world. They live a nomadic lifestyle raising cattle and goats, wearing traditional clothes, and living in small villages called (manyattas), which are circular arrangements of mud huts. But increasing land acquisition throughout Kenya’s Maasailand is threatening their nomadic culture, and pressure to accept change is growing world which I accept it as a masai learned warrior. With this pressure comes a more urgent need to educate the current generation of boys and girls but mostly girl child because of the lower dignity being given in masai life. In the process of preserving their culture, however, the Maasai have embraced a system that denies women basic human rights: the right to an education; the right to control her body, the right to choose whom and when to marry, the right to express an opinion.so I'm writing this masai story about the masai girl/woman on behalf of the bright learned warrior, I world like to share this story about girls from one of the local school in a village called Empopongi.

That they are able to graduate from grade 8th and the scored nice grades which qualify them to join high school coming July but because of their families status most of them will end up going under this oppression if they don't get any help from well wishers and I'm so pleased and happy to share this story so if any wishes to rescue them from this cultural pressures you can linked our director Cassie so that we can move this girls to high school and give them woman rights necessity and I'm sure God will bless you whoever your.

Maasai girls must face many obstacles to get an education, and most of those are related to the high level of poverty among the Maasai as I have mentioned above one of the reasons masai girls don't get education. The cost of education is prohibitive for most families, and the promise of a dowry is a powerful incentive for arranging a daughter’s marriage as soon as she “crosses the childhood bridge.” But cultural factors also contribute to preventing girls from getting and education.The economic, cultural and physical factors that combine to deny education to Maasai girls in Kenya are numerous and, taken together, almost impossible for all but the most determined girls to overcome which I believe when we provide this girls education I'm sure they will do so . Even when possible, Maasai girls have the added impediment of cultural beliefs that prevent many from enrolling or completing school which includes Economic incentives for early marriage, such as cattle and cash dowries.The distances that a girl must walk to the nearest school make it unsafe, and even impossible for a nursery-school-age child,Maasai girls who do enroll in primary school attend public day schools which are free. But all students in Kenya are required to wear uniforms, and many families cannot afford even the uniform needed for their child to go to school. Public primary boarding schools, which offer many advantages, are prohibitively expensive for most Maasai families. The quality of education in these rural day schools is rarely adequate to prepare students for the national tests, which are required to go on to secondary school, because these schools are underfunded and woefully overcrowded, with a student-teacher ratio as high as 100 to 1.but I thank God girls from Empopongi primary school had past well and scored good grades.

For the exceptional girl who does pass the national test to graduate from primary school, all secondary schools in Kenya are boarding schools, and the annual cost is prohibitive for most Maasai.Thank you and God bless you.

~masai girl education fund.